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Author Topic: Galletti - Farfugium Japonicum  (Read 11428 times)
Mike
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Galletti - Farfugium Japonicum
« on: October 14, 2008, 18:47:04 PM »

 I am new to the forum and I would like to say hello to all.
I am mostly into growing Galletti- farfugium Japonicum, differant varieties.
I also love growing Amaryllis- Hippeastrum.
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Avocado
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Re: Galletti - Farfugium Japonicum
« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2008, 19:17:05 PM »

Hello! You mentioned different varieties of Farfugium.

Do they have different sized or coloured leaves?

Moreover, do you grow them in a yard in shade and finally what type of soil or compost do you use?

When I tried to grow them, I had problems especially with insect pests - especially; miskta and I never seem to be able to find a site in the garden where they can thrive. Sad
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MG
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Re: Galletti - Farfugium Japonicum
« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2008, 19:53:07 PM »

I was not really "into" Galletti but I was given one about a year and a half ago. I potted it up but for some reason something went wrong, for a long period it would put out a new leaf, and the previous leaf then wilted and died - it was always a leaf-and-a-half plant.  I was particularly careful not to overwater of course but then again also never to let this plant dry out, as they do not like that at all. I suspected some pests attacking the roots but since it did not actually die, I let it be.

The decision was that if the situation got worse I would take it out of the compost, inspect and clean out the roots, and re-plant in fresh compost. However it neither improved nor got any worse, and the fact that it very regularly put out new leaves was encouraging, notwithstanding the fact that they only lasted until the next one appeared.

After a very long period of this situation, probably around a year, it has now grown out of it and is very healthy and normal looking, bearing several leaves. I wonder, Mike, if you have any idea of what could have been the problem.

The plant was always located in a bright location outdoors but never in direct sunlight - actually, the same place it is now, so I either suspect insects or else some form of root fungus.

Re Amaryllis - have often propagated these by seed and now have a number, which I often give away. In fact I stopped making an effort as one quickly gets overwhelmed.

The seeds germinate readily and a flowering-size bulb will be formed possibly in 3-4 years or less under ideal conditions.

However they will only produce seed if artificially pollinated, a simple matter with a small brush or even a finger, transferring pollen from the anthers to the stigma. A worthwhile exercise - for a while!!

MG
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Avocado
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Re: Galletti - Farfugium Japonicum
« Reply #3 on: October 16, 2008, 13:05:25 PM »

Hello - You two have certainly mastered the technique of growing this plant, which incidentally does not appear to be as popular as it used to be.

It does not seem to be popular abroad either.....

Its flowers are unattractive; incomplete yellow daisy-like bunches on a tall stalk. I believe it is a leguminous plant like peas and beans but fail to see any resemblence to the latter plants' flowers!

As a boy I remember it used to be common place in a town houses' internal yards and Galletti were grown in zinc containers for washing the laundry on Mondays.... I vaguely remember the leaves were larger than the varieties I've seen for sale of late.

Nostalgic memories of a bygone age....

 ???I'm not sure if it is best grown in soil or compost. What is your experience?

Thanks. 
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MG
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Re: Galletti - Farfugium Japonicum
« Reply #4 on: October 16, 2008, 14:00:47 PM »

Hardly "mastered", the fact that it is still alive is only credit to the plant itself  Grin

Farfugium is an Asteraceae, not Leguminosae, hence the "daisy like flowers"

As far as popularity goes, I think that this plant is relatively more popular in Malta than in other European countries. The reason for this is probably lost in the mists of time. It is what I'd call a "classic" Maltese house (yard) plant. Keeping company with Aspidistra, Felci, Sanseveria, Rampila, and the like, the staples of any older Maltese house with a yard or garden.

Definitely, nowadays people have a lot more options, very few have cool, internal yards any more (!) and Farfugium is more of a nostalgic choice for the relatively fewer who still do.

It will be sad if this plant becomes uncommon as it's a beautiful, typical plant.

As far as growing medium goes, compost is an almost exclusive recommendation for all pot grown plants.

MG
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Avocado
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Re: Galletti - Farfugium Japonicum
« Reply #5 on: October 17, 2008, 12:02:01 PM »

Yes, you're right about the greater variety of plants available on the market.
Sadly the type of pests too, has increased and these in turn make it all the more difficult to grow all types of plants! Suffice it to say that pests can also be introduced in the compost of imported plants. Things like worms which eat earthworms and so on....with disastrous effects on our eco-system...etc.

I was misled into thinking that they were members of  the Legume family by somebody years ago and am glad that I can now reconcile that they are in fact members of the daisy family as their flowers amply show.

When I looked up the internet years ago there was no information about Farfugium but there are now a number of websites which describe the plant in question. It may be making a come back in popularity!

Thanks for the information. I shall certainly try and get a new plant1 Grin
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Avocado
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Re: Galletti - Farfugium Japonicum
« Reply #6 on: October 17, 2008, 18:41:14 PM »

I wonder if the zinc in the metal containers might be beneficial to the plant by keeping the compost fresh or healthy possibly avoiding root disease.

Perhaps zinc is also required by the plant. In humans, zinc is required to allow wound healing - nappy rashes in babies and bedsore prevention in the elderly.

Certainly silver has a  bacteriostatic effect - reducing infections - the knights of St John used to use silver plates etc. at  the Infimary because this fact had already been discovered.

Fertilizers such as miracle grow and phostrogen are formulated to provide these minerals, but the vivid memory of just how healthy those Galletti  were in those zinc containers and internal yard is something that strikes me to this very day!
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jajay
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Re: Galletti - Farfugium Japonicum
« Reply #7 on: October 17, 2008, 20:36:00 PM »

It is a pity if this plant becomes uncommon.  I really like it, especially when the leaves are large.  I had one but I managed to kill it  Shocked  and it also went through that phase of being a one-leaf plant for quite a while but then it improved and had lots and lots of leaves... and then it went back to one leaf before dying completely. I will definitely be getting another one but at the moment I need to do some works in the yard so I will have to wait a bit.
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Avocado
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Re: Galletti - Farfugium Japonicum
« Reply #8 on: October 23, 2008, 20:55:26 PM »

Local garden shop inform me they're available for sale in November. Smiley
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Avocado
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Re: Galletti - Farfugium Japonicum
« Reply #9 on: November 22, 2008, 17:14:18 PM »

Finally I bought a small but healthy plant which is flowering at present.  Smiley

Now I have to find a suitable place to grow it. Today I've placed it in the South facing Porch - as the gale force winds would break it if I place it in the back garden facing North...  Of course, it will have to move as the sun gets hotter next year! Undecided
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MG
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Re: Galletti - Farfugium Japonicum
« Reply #10 on: November 22, 2008, 18:27:53 PM »

Yup, they wilt under direct sunlight. They rapidly recover but of course would be unsightly for the duration.

Protect from slugs and snails, place a few pellets on the soil surface.

MG

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Jetset
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Re: Galletti - Farfugium Japonicum
« Reply #11 on: November 22, 2008, 19:44:19 PM »

My Amaryliss last summer.  Highly attractive to slugs and snails which can devour a whole leaf practically overnight!  Is it possible to get two flowers in a season?
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MG
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Re: Galletti - Farfugium Japonicum
« Reply #12 on: November 23, 2008, 13:16:26 PM »

I never had Amaryllis flower more than once, but some bulbs may thow up two flowering stalks on occasion.

Slugs and snails not only eat the leaves - they can hollow out the top of the bulb, too  Shocked

MG
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rennabe
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Re: Galletti - Farfugium Japonicum
« Reply #13 on: January 13, 2010, 14:15:07 PM »

I am considering raising galletti from seeds. Any tips?
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officer
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Re: Galletti - Farfugium Japonicum
« Reply #14 on: January 14, 2010, 11:35:30 AM »

Hello All,

I  will be the first to state that, for numerous reasons, compost is preferable to soil for growing potted plants. However, let us not forget that most plants' roots  form a symbiotic relationship with  some micro organisms and bacteria which could only be found in soil. Typical examples are mycorrhiza, rhizobacter etc.  These are completely missing in commercial composts since most are sterilised. Could it be that today's Farfugium are so different due to the overuse of composts? What do you guys think?

Regards, Officer
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